Comic Review: Zaya by Jean-David Morvan

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Title: Zaya (Zaya #1-3)

Author:  Jean-David Morvan, Huang-Jia Wei (Illustrations), Mike Kennedy (Translator)
Release Date:  August 26th 2014
Publisher:  Magnetic Press
Source: Sent by Publisher
Rating: ★★
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Zaya tells the story of secret agent in the distant future who left her post to seek a normal life as an artist and mother. When a biomechanical threat destroys an orbiting colony station and former fellow agents start dying, she is called back into the field to find and stop the danger. Her investigation leads to many questions about her own past, filled with explosive revelations.

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My Review: 

This is the first comic that I've read from Jean-David Morvan, a french comic book writer. The story is really standard sci-fi, with the setting switching from a futuristic space battle and civilian life on Earth.  

The main character is Zaya, a retired special operative who's a single mother with twins, and when tragedy strikes, is forced to come out of retirement and complete one last mission for SPIRAL, the organization she used to work for.

What I liked about this comic was the story and the neat little twist at the end, setting up the next arc in the series. Zaya was well done as a character and I liked her development and the relationships she had with the other characters in the story, most of them being women. Morvan didn't make a big deal about this and took the time to cultivate these female relationships.  She was more than a cookie cutter Action Girl.

What I didn't like about Zaya, however, was the art. It was horrendous. Huang-Jia Wei's style in this comic was messy, streaky and indistinguishable. It completely hindered the story and his art was lazy. It looked like he sketched the whole book haphazardly and turned it in. 

I noticed that Morvan had a much better artist for his other comic, Naja, and I don't know what made him decide to work with Wei.

Four stars with one star off for the horrible art. The writer should definitely replace the artist since Huang-Jia Wei is doing nothing than hindering the story being told, instead of enhancing it. Still recommended, despite its shortcomings. 








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